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The Lamborghini Cars

Diablo
Countach
Jalpa

Miura
Espada

The Lamborghini Diablo

The Lamborghini Diablo, capable of 0-60 in 4 seconds. The Diablo, first introduced in 1990, was a huge hit (no pun intended). It is Lamborghini's all time crash king in number of cars totaled. 

 It took four years of design and testing before the Lamborghini Diablo was introduced to the public and journalists in Monte Carlo on January 20,1990. It was the second 'Lamborghini day' and the feeling was that the Diablo was finally ready to take over the tradition of the Miura and the Countach. 

A team of more than 100 people had worked almost full time on the development of the Diablo. More than 500,000km of road tests had been done, and the engine had been tested for no less than 10,000 hours at the bench.

 Seemingly insurmountable problems were faced in the design of the new engine - strict anti-pollution regulations had been introduced and old carburetors could not be used for cars sold in the United States. There were simply no commercial electronic fuel injection systems available on the market for a 12-cylinder engine.

Engineer Checkorani, head of the research and development department, was commandeered to develop a totally new electronic fuel injection system. Using internal Lamborghini resources, the result was the new engine system called L.I.E. - a design still found in today's Lamborghini engines.

Special techniques used in frame construction, enabled the Diablo to easily pass the more demanding crash tests required. Cloak and dagger tactics were employed to maintain the yet-to-be unveiled car. The new prototypes were tested again on the roads close to the factory and on the Navdo racetrack. The Lamborghini Diablo was allowed to circulate in its actual shape during night tests,but disguises were employed during daylight to confound the photographers who were impatient to catch the new Lamborghini.

The new tests at Navdo showed that the engine was up to its task, allowing the Diablo to reach 340 km per hour. The Diablo was the fastest production car in the world. Performance was certified during the test at the Navdo race track. Maximum speed was 325.2 km per hour.

Acceleration from zero to 100 was certified at 4.09 seconds. From a still start, a kilometer was run in 20.7 seconds. The initial goal of Project 132,to build the number one car in the world, was met in four years of hard work. 

 

 

 

The Lamborghini Countach

The Lamborghini Countach, one of the classic exotics, was a child hood dream to many growing up in the 80s. The Countach was way ahead of its time when it was introduced in 1974 and produced until 1990. Capable of achieving a top speed of over 180 MPH. The Lamborghini Countach is the car you put at the top of the Christmas wish list� the car you would drive if you wanted EVERYONE to notice you. The Lamborghini simply has something (besides a heart-attack inducing price-tag!) that makes the most cynical of us sit up and take notice.

 And dream on having the resources and the intestinal fortitude to actually buy one.. How many of us plastered our computer screens with wallpaper posters of this car? 

Mine was a white Lamborghini Jalpa and I know of innumerable Countach' s that have been immortalized in bedrooms, offices and garages around the world.

 This site shares some of the images and information that have helped create the legend that is the Lamborghini.

 

 

 The Lamborghini � Jalpa

 This more subtle of the Lamborghini stable was originally known as project 118. The Lamborghini Jalpa featured the same chassis as the earlier Silhouette, but the P350 boasted featured a redesigned body, more precise steering, and an improved 3.4 liter engine.

 With a steel body, centrally located engine and sheer speed (the Jalpa traveled from 0-60 in 7.3 seconds) the Jalpa won plenty of fan. Unlike the Urraco,this Lamborghini met criteria allowing it to be sold in the U.S. 

Initially, the Jalpa went on sale in 1982. By 1987,sales had showed a marked decline. Production was halted by Lamborghini in July 1988 after constructing just 410 Jalpas.

 The car is now a high-priced collectible which still holds street appeal some 20 years on.

 

 

The Lamborghini Miura

This was first shown at the Geneva Salon in 1966, and it quickly became a classic. Both ends could be tilted up, to provide access at the front to the spare wheel and front suspension, and at the back to the transversely placed 3.9-litre V12 engine. And the most striking newcomer of the sixties was undoubtedly Lamborghini. Ferrucio Lamborghini was a successful manufacturer of Farm Tractors and Central Heating equipment who realized his dream of becoming a car maker in 1963 with the launch of his 350GTV. this was the Gran Turismo coupe powered by a 270 bhp 3.5 liter four overhead cam shaft V12 engine designed by Giotto Bizzarini , who soon left the project to return to his own design studios. This engine was later enlarged to just under four liters and this was the powered unit that went into the car that came to be called the Miura.


This had somewhat unusual background in that the chassis was built, unknown to the boss, by the Lamborghini employees, Gianpaolo Dallara, Bob Wallace and Paolo Stanzini, in their spare time they welded box section structure with coil independent suspension all round, in which the V12 engine was located transversely. Power was transmitted to the clutch by a pair of spur gears, and thence to a 5-speed gearbox. From there another pair of gears, transmitted power to the differential. This chassis met with Lamborghini's approval and went on exhibition at the 1965 Turin Show. By the Geneva Show the following March it had acquired a body designed by Marcello Gandini of Bertone, and was given the name Miura after a celebrated Spanish breeder of fighting bulls, Eduardo Miura. At first considered as a one-off show car, the Miura attracted many serious enquiries from would-be customers, and Lamborghini decided to put it into production.


The first car was delivered to its owner in March 1967, and 108 Miuras were sold that year. The next year, the first of full production, 184 cars were delivered, and the Miura was on its way to becoming a legend. The original version had a top speed of 173 mph (278.5 km/h), and this was increased to just short of 180 mph (289.5 km/h) on subsequent models. Road holding was exceptional and the Miura was remarkably untemperamental, suffering little from the plug fouling or irregular idling often associated with exotic machinery. Customers included Canadian Grand Prix sponsor Walter Wolf, who has owned several subsequent Lamborghini�s, and a number of pop stars, as well as wealthy enthusiasts on both sides of the Atlantic.


In January 1969 an improved model, the Miura S, was announced. This had a more powerful engine giving 375 hp, with air conditioning and electrically operated windows as options. Two years later came the final development, the Miura SV with wider rear tyres to cope with the still greater power resulting from different cam timing, modified carburetors and bigger inlet valves. Output was now 385 bhp at 7,850 rpm, and top speed 179.8 mph (289.3 km/h). Most of the bugs had been ironed out by this time, and the SV was, and is, the most desirable of all. the Miuras. It remained in production for a little more than twelve months, as it was to be succeeded by the even more dramatic Countach. Total production of Miuras was 765.


Outside the main car producing European countries few sports cars were made. In Spain a brief but brilliant comet flashed across the scene in the shape of the Pegaso. This was designed by Witfredo Ricart and built by ENASA, the government owned Barcelona company who were, and still are, Spain's largest makers of trucks and buses. Ricart's design was immensely complicated, with a four camshaft V8 engine featuring dry sump lubrication and sodium cooled exhaust valves. This was the first use of twin camshafts per block in a road going car, earlier examples being purely racing engines by Mercedes Benz, Miller and Novi. Ferrari did not use this design for a road car until the GTB4 Daytona of 1968. The gearbox had five indirect speeds without synchromesh, and was mounted on the rear axle. In its original form, as shown at the 1951 Paris Salon, the 2�-litre engine developed between 165 and 225 bhp according to tune', but later versions were enlarged to 2.8 and then 3.2 litres. The latter could be supercharged, when output was claimed as 350 bhp. From about 1955 Rican simplified his engines, using pushrod V85 of 4, 41/2 or 4.7 litres, the largest giving 300 bhp.
Pegaso boaies were mostly by outside coachbuilders, although early models had factory bodies, a neat 2 + 2 coupe something like a Ferrari 166, and a convertible. These were more restrained than the subsequent creations by Saoutchik. Later Pegaso chassis were shipped to Milan to be bodied by Touring, but this made them very expensive, and the final cars were Spanish-bodied by Jose Serra. Pegasos were raced on rare occasions, but their brakes were inadequate for their weight, and the company did not keep up with the latest technology such as disc brakes. Commercial vehicles claimed most of their attention and finance, and the Pegaso car was dropped in 1958 after about 100 had been made. Of these, only four were later pushrod Z.103 models.


Although their rally drivers and cars have scored innumerable successes, Sweden has never been renowned for its sports cars. However, both its leading manufacturers have made sports cars during the period under review. Saab were first in the field, with an open two-seater derived from the 3-cylinder 93 saloon. Only six of these were made, in 1956, and they were intended for racing, with no production in mind. The 748-cc engine and transmission were turned round, compared with the saloon, so that the engine was behind the front wheels. This gave better weight distribution as the two-seater steel/light-alloy monocoque was much lighter than the four-seater saloon.


The 1956 car was christened the Sonett, and this name was revived ten years later when Saab launched a GT coupe based on the 841-cc 96 saloon. By now the company had a worldwide reputation for their rally cars, thanks to the successes of Erik Carlsson.

 


The Lamborghini Espada

This was first shown at the Geneva Salon in 1966, and it quickly became a classic. Both ends could be tilted up, to provide access at the front to the spare wheel and front suspension, and at the back to the transversely placed 3.9-litre V12 engine. And the most striking newcomer of the sixties was undoubtedly Lamborghini. Ferrucio Lamborghini was a successful manufacturer of Farm Tractors and Central Heating equipment who realized his dream of becoming a car maker in 1963 with the launch of his 350GTV. this was the Gran Turismo coupe powered by a 270 bhp 3.5 litre four overhead cam shaft V12 engine designed by Giotto Bizzarini , who soon left the project to return to his own design studios. This engine was later enlarged to just under four litres and this was the powered unit that went into the car that came to be called the Miura.


This had somewhat unusual background in that the chassis was built, unknown to the boss, by the Lamborghini employees, Gianpaolo Dallara, Bob Wallace and Paolo Stanzini, in their spare time they welded box section structure with coil independent suspension all round, in which the V12 engine was located transversely. Power was transmitted to the clutch by a pair of spur gears, and thence to a 5-speed gearbox. From there another pair of gears, transmitted power to the differential. This chassis met with Lamborghini's approval and went on exhibition at the 1965 Turin Show. By the Geneva Show the following March it had acquired a body designed by Marcello Gandini of Bertone, and was given the name Miura after a celebrated Spanish breeder of fighting bulls, Eduardo Miura. At first considered as a one-off show car, the Miura attracted many serious enquiries from would-be customers, and Lamborghini decided to put it into production.


The first car was delivered to its owner in March 1967, and 108 Miuras were sold that year. The next year, the first of full production, 184 cars were delivered, and the Miura was on its way to becoming a legend. The original version had a top speed of 173 mph (278.5 km/h), and this was increased to just short of 180 mph (289.5 km/h) on subsequent models. Road holding was exceptional and the Miura was remarkably untemperamental, suffering little from the plug fouling or irregular idling often associated with exotic machinery. Customers included Canadian Grand Prix sponsor Walter Wolf, who has owned several subsequent Lamborghini�s, and a number of pop stars, as well as wealthy enthusiasts on both sides of the Atlantic.


In January 1969 an improved model, the Miura S, was announced. This had a more powerful engine giving 375 hp, with air conditioning and electrically operated windows as options. Two years later came the final development, the Miura SV with wider rear tyres to cope with the still greater power resulting from different cam timing, modified carburetors and bigger inlet valves. Output was now 385 bhp at 7,850 rpm, and top speed 179.8 mph (289.3 km/h). Most of the bugs had been ironed out by this time, and the SV was, and is, the most desirable of all. the Miuras. It remained in production for a little more than twelve months, as it was to be succeeded by the even more dramatic Countach. Total production of Miuras was 765.


Outside the main car producing European countries few sports cars were made. In Spain a brief but brilliant comet flashed across the scene in the shape of the Pegaso. This was designed by Witfredo Ricart and built by ENASA, the government owned Barcelona company who were, and still are, Spain's largest makers of trucks and buses. Ricart's design was immensely complicated, with a four camshaft V8 engine featuring dry sump lubrication and sodium cooled exhaust valves. This was the first use of twin camshafts per block in a road going car, earlier examples being purely racing engines by Mercedes Benz, Miller and Novi. Ferrari did not use this design for a road car until the GTB4 Daytona of 1968. The gearbox had five indirect speeds without synchromesh, and was mounted on the rear axle. In its original form, as shown at the 1951 Paris Salon, the 2�-litre engine developed between 165 and 225 bhp according to tune', but later versions were enlarged to 2.8 and then 3.2 litres. The latter could be supercharged, when output was claimed as 350 bhp. From about 1955 Rican simplified his engines, using pushrod V85 of 4, 41/2 or 4.7 litres, the largest giving 300 bhp.


Pegaso boaies were mostly by outside coachbuilders, although early models had factory bodies, a neat 2 + 2 coupe something like a Ferrari 166, and a convertible. These were more restrained than the subsequent creations by Saoutchik. Later Pegaso chassis were shipped to Milan to be bodied by Touring, but this made them very expensive, and the final cars were Spanish-bodied by Jose Serra. Pegasos were raced on rare occasions, but their brakes were inadequate for their weight, and the company did not keep up with the latest technology such as disc brakes. Commercial vehicles claimed most of their attention and finance,1 and the Pegaso car was dropped in 1958 after about 100 had been made. Of these, only four were later pushrod Z.103 models.


Although their rally drivers and cars have scored innumerable successes, Sweden has never been renowned for its sports cars. However, both its leading manufacturers have made sports cars during the period under review. Saab were first in the field, with an open two-seater derived from the 3-cylinder 93 saloon. Only six of these were made, in 1956, and they were intended for racing, with no production in mind. The 748-cc engine and transmission were turned round, compared with the saloon, so that the engine was behind the front wheels. This gave better weight distribution as the two-seater steel/light-alloy monocoque was much lighter than the four-seater saloon.

Disclaimer: All information displayed here are not in anyway related to J&J concepts. This site is not in anyway related to offcial lamborghini SPA or its respective owners. 
www.lamborghini.com


 


Learn about Ferruccio Lamborghini, his dreams goals and how he got started.

The definitive history of the Lamborghini, the company..

Learn about the cars and parts that made Lamborghini a household name.

 

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